Guilty (1980)

Catalog Number(s):

This page: Tracks > About the Album > Billboard Charts > Grammy Noms > CD Packaging Notes > Cover Outtakes >

Guilty LP cover

Guilty album back cover

(Below: The Guilty album was a gatefold album. The inside spread is pictured below ...)

Guilty gatefold album

(Below: The Guilty album also contained a photo-sleeve to house the LP. On one side was another Streisand/Gibb photograph; the other side contained session credits for the album.)

photograph side of album sleeve

Credits side of sleeve

There are several iterations of Guilty available for sale (as of December 2008 when this page was created). Links to Amazon.com are provided beneath the cover of each version below ...

Front cover Buy from Amazon Guilty Dual Disc Buy from Amazon 2 disc import Buy from Amazon

Tracks

  1. Guilty (Duet with Barry Gibb) [4:27]
    (B. Gibb / R. Gibb / M. Gibb)
  2. Woman In Love [3:54]
    (B. Gibb / R. Gibb)
  3. Run Wild [4:09]
    (B. Gibb / R. Gibb)
  4. Promises [4:22]
    (B. Gibb / R. Gibb)
  5. The Love Inside [5:12]
    (B. Gibb)
  6. What Kind Of Fool (Duet with Barry Gibb) [4:07]
    (B. Gibb / A. Galuten)
  7. Life Story [4:38]
    (B. Gibb / R. Gibb)
  8. Never Give Up [3:44]
    (B. Gibb / A. Galuten)
  9. Make It Like A Memory [7:31]
    (B. Gibb / A. Galuten)

Dual Disc DVD Tracks:

  1. Interview [DVD]
  2. Guilty [DVD]
  3. What Kind of Fool [DVD]
  4. Stranger In a Strange Land [DVD]

* DualDisc contains the original Guilty CD on one side of the disc in Enhanced LPCM Stereo and a DVD on the other side.

About the Album

Streisand’s Guilty album is her biggest selling album to date — over 5 million units worldwide.

Streisand remarked, “I’ve always looked back on the Guilty album as one of the easiest, most pleasant recording experiences I’ve ever had. Barry just made the process a delight. Maybe because he’s an artist himself, he understands what it takes to be a producer for another singer.”

Barry Gibb explained, “I wanted to produce her best-selling album, and I accomplished that.”

At first, Gibb was nervous to work with Barbra. “We all had heard stories about how tough she is, and she is this enormous star,” he said. “That’s got to intimidate anyone. I didn’t want to do it at first, but my wife told me to do it or she’d divorce me! I even called Neil Diamond to ask what it was like to work with her. He had nothing but glowing reports, so I felt a little less scared.

“Working with her turned out to be wonderful,” Gibb confessed. “She wanted my ideas and she gave me a lot of leeway—but she also wanted me to listen to her ideas, which I was glad to do. She was perfectly nice—a true lady in every sense of the word.

“And she was a hard worker. She’d work from 7 a.m. until late into the night—and during the breaks, she’d be working the script of Yentl. But we did have to lock her up when the food came, because she always wanted to eat. We had to keep her away from the food so she’d keep singing!”

Gibb newspaper article

Gibb assembled around him a production team consisting of Albhy Galuten and Karl Richardson. None of the other Gibb brothers were involved in the Guilty project. Gibb recorded instrumental tracks at the Bee Gees’ studio (Middle Ear in Miami Beach, which closed in 2006). Orchestral parts were added at Criteria Studio in Miami. Barry then flew to Los Angeles to record Streisand’s vocals. Streisand was used to recording with a live orchestra, but for the Guilty album she sang to Gibb’s pre-recorded tracks.

“What Kind of Fool” took extra care to produce and finding the right balance of Streisand's and Gibb's voices was the challenge. They recorded it three times—in February, March, and June 1980, with the final version being the one recorded at Media Sound in New York in June.

Two Gibb songs (“Secrets” and “Carried Away”) were written for Guilty but not used. Both appear on Gibb’s Guilty Demos which are officially available for download on iTunes—the demos feature Gibb singing the songs he wrote for Streisand. Other artists have recorded the outtake songs, including Elaine Paige and Olivia Newton-John.

Guilty Demos at iTunes

The Guilty Dual Disc (remastered audio on one side; video content on the other) was released in 2005 in conjunction with the “sequel”, Guilty Pleasures.

Billboard Charts

The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine.

Here's the numbers for this Streisand album:

Gold: 500,000 units shipped

Platinum: 1 million units shipped.

Note: The record company must submit an album to the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) where it undergoes a certification process to become eligible for an award. The process entails an independent sales audit, which calculates the quantity of singles or albums shipped for sale, net after returns. The audit surveys shipments to the entire music marketplace, including retail, record clubs, television sales, Internet orders and other ancillary markets. Based on the certification of these shipments, a title is awarded Gold, Platinum, Multi-Platinum or Diamond status. The data here comes directly from official sources, mainly the RIAA online database.

Grammy Noms & Win

Grammy pose

Above: Streisand joins Jon Peters (left), Barry Gibb (center), and Billy Joel (right) at the Columbia Records post-Grammy party at the Four Seasons Hotel, 1981.

CD Packaging Notes

Microphone series

The original LP of Guilty was handsomely produced: Mario Casilli's gorgeous photographs graced the cover and back cover. The album was of gatefold design ... when you opened it up, another photograph of Gibb and Streisand greeted you. Inside the album, Columbia included a picture sleeve for the LP with credits on one side and another Casilli photograph on the other.

When it came time to issue Guilty on CD, some of the original artwork got lost in the translation.

The first CD of Guilty had color problems, with Barbra and Barry Gibb looking too yellow (or too orange!) on the cover. The CD insert unfolded four ways and included the same photograph of Barry and Barbra that the original gatefold LP used.

The 2005 DualDisc—dubbed The 25th Anniversary Edition— was a Streisand fan's dream! (If only Sony/BMG would continue along these lines with the rest of Streisand's catalogue!)

The DualDisc insert unfolded like an accordian and contained outtakes from the cover photo session by Mario Casilli. The color was spot-on and Barbra and Barry have great skin tone again.

Interestingly ... None of the CD releases have contained these photographs (right), which originally appeared on the LP's gatefold center.

Also, the photo below, which appeared on one whole side of the Guilty LP's sleeve, has never appeared on any of the CD releases either:

Missing Guilty photo

It seems like an unfair quibble, considering what a great job Columbia did with the Guilty DualDisc in 2005.

But ... one more quibble: Will fans ever get a digital copy of the promotional 12-inch, 5:55 minute extended version of “Promises” (Catalog # 43 02089)?

Promises record label

Album Cover Outtakes

Mario Casilli told author Shaun Considine how the Guilty photos were created: “I wasn't hired to shoot the cover,” he said. “Tony Lane from Columbia already had an idea for the Guilty cover. He wanted to have her photographed in the studio with a saint on one shoulder and a devil on the other. So when I got to the [recording] session I took some test shots of her and Barry, wearing a white blouse and white slacks. She looked at the shots and said, ‘Let's do more of these.’ We shot for about an hour. It was fun. Sometimes you're lucky enough to ride on a wave. Something happens and you've got your camera going.”

Casilli outtake

Tony Lane elaborated about the session: “Mario sent out one of his assistants for some white background paper. We decided to set up a part of the recording studio as a photo studio.”

Outtakes from the Casilli photography session were included as a bonus feature on the 2005 DualDisc version of Guilty.

Casilli outtakes

End.

<-- Previous Streisand Album

Next Streisand Album -->

[ top of page ]