Emotion (1984)

Catalog Number(s):

Emotion LP covers

Tracks

  1. Emotion [4:59]
    (P. Bliss)
  2. Make No Mistake, He's Mine (Duet with Kim Carnes) [4:12]
    (K. Carnes)
  3. Time Machine [4:54]
    (M. White / M. Page / B. Fairweather)
  4. Best I Could [4:20]
    (B. Whiteside / R. Parker)
  5. Left In The Dark [6:19]
    (J. Steinman)
  6. Heart Don't Change My Mind [4:54]
    (D. Warren / R. Buchanan)
  7. When I Dream [4:40]
    (M. Colombier / K. Wakefield / R. Baskin)
  8. You're A Step In The Right Direction [3:54]
    (J. Mellencamp / B. Streisand)
  9. Clear Sailing [3:56]
    (P. McIan / A. Montgomery)
  10. Here We Are At Last [3:20]
    (B. Streisand / R. Baskin)

Individual track credits:

(mouse and click on each song to reveal the credits...)

1. Emotion

Written by: Peter Bliss

Produced by: Richard Perry

Track Engineered by: Gary Skardina

Vocals & Overdubs Engineered by: John Arrias

Remixed by John Arrias

Additional Engineering: Alex Schmoll & Roger Paglia

Recorded & Mixed at Studio 55 (Los Angeles, Calif.)

Date Recorded: June 24, 1985

Drum Machine programmed by: Peter Bliss

Bass: Nathan East

Guitars: Peter Bliss, Howie Rice, Dennis Herring

Synthesizers: Howie Rice, Steve Mitchell, Richard Ruttenberg

Percussion: Paulinho da Costa

Background Vocals: The Pointer Siters (Anita, Ruth, & June)

Barbra's track notes: “It was a real kick to have The Pointer Sisters sing with me on this record. Thank you, Anita, Ruth and June. Love, Barbra.

2. Make No Mistake, He's Mine (Duet with Kim Carnes)

Written by: Kim Carnes

Produced by: Bill Cuomo and Kim Carnes

Track Recorded at Record One (Sherman Oaks, Calif.)

Date Recorded: June 21, 1984

Engineer: Niko Bolas / Second Engineer: Richard Bosworth

Additional recording at: Ocean Way Studios (Hollywood, Calif.)

Engineer: Rik Pekkonen / Second Engineers: Judy Clapp & Steve Krimmel

Strings Recorded at: Evergreen Studios (Burbank, Calif.)

Engineers: John Richards & Mike Hatcher

Mixed at Studio 55 (Los Angeles, Calif.)

Mixed by: John Arrias / Second Engineer: Glen Holguin

Piano: Bill Cuomo

Bass: Leland Sklar

Drums: Gary Mallaber

Guitar: Craig Hull

Strings & Synthesizer: Bill Cuomo

Cello: Ray Kelly

Strings Arranged by: Bill Cumo

Concertmaster: Sid Sharp

3. Time Machine

Written by: Maurice White, Martin Page, Brian Fairweather

Produced by: Maurice White for Kalimba Productions

Recorded at The Complex Studios (West Los Angeles, Calif.) and Sound Castle Recording Studios (Los Angeles, Calif.)

Date Recorded: May 17, 1984

Recorded by: Jeremy Smith and Dennis McCade

Asst. Engineers: Mitch Gibson, Sharon Rice, Paul Ericksen, and Murray Dvorkin

Keyboards: Robbie Buchanan and Michel Colombier

Synthesizers & Synthesizer Programming by: Robbie Buchanan / Additional Synthesizer Programming by: Gary K. Chang

Drums: John Robinson

Bass: Abraham Laboriel

Guitar: Paul M. Jackson, Jr.

Percussion: Paulinho da Costa

Background Vocals: Maxine Waters Willard, Julia Waters Tillman, Clydene Jackson Edwards and Maurice White

Vocal Arrangements by: Maurice White

Horn Arrangements by: Robbie Buchanan

Rhythm Arrangements by: Martin Page, Brian Fairweather, and Maurice White

4. Best I Could

Written by: Bobby Whiteside, Richard Parker

Produced by: Charles Koppelman and Barbra Streisand

Engineered by: John Arrias

Recorded Live at Capitol Recording Studio “A” (Hollywood, Calif.)

Date Recorded: May 21, 24, 1984

Assistant Engineer: Hugh Davies

Mixed at Studio 55 (Los Angeles, Calif.)

Assistant Engineer: Glen Holguin

Additional Recording: The Village Recorder (Los Angeles, Calif.)

Piano/Rhodes: Ed Tossing

Drums: Tom Radtke

Guitars: George Doering, Bruce Gaitsch

Bass: Bob Lizik

Synthesizer: Randy Waldman

Percussion: Steve Forman

Drum Programmer: Vince Gutman

Arranged & Conducted by: Bobby Whiteside

Concertmaster: Andre Granat

5. Left in the Dark

Written by: Jim Steinman

Produced by: Jim Steinman

Engineered by: Neil Dorfsman

Associate Producer: John Jansen

Recorded at The Power Station (New York); and The Village Recorder (Los Angeles, Calif.)

Date Recorded: June 18, 1984

Assistants: Bruce Lampcov, Dave Greenberg, Nelson Ayres, and Steve Hirsch

Mixed by: Neil Dorfsman, John Jansen and Jim Steinman at The Power Station (New York)

Production Coordinator: Don Ketteler

Piano: Roy Bittan

Drums: Max Weinberg

Synthesizers: Larry Fast

Lead Guitar: Rick Derringer

Bass: Steve Buslowe

Percussion: Jimmy Maelen

Additional Guitars: Jeffrey Southworth

Background Vocals & Arrangements: Rory Dodd, Holly Sherwood and Eric Troyer

Arranged by: Jim Steinman

6. Heart Don't Change My Mind

Written by: Diane Warren, Robbie Buchanan

Produced by: Maurice White for Kalimba Productions

Recorded at The Complex Studios (West Los Angeles, Calif.) and Sound Castle Recording Studios (Los Angeles, Calif.)

Date Recorded: June 22, 1984

Recorded by: Jeremy Smith and Dennis McCade

Asst. Engineers: Mitch Gibson, Sharon Rice, Paul Ericksen, and Murray Dvorkin

Keyboards: Robbie Buchanan and Michel Colombier

Synthesizers & Synthesizer Programming by: Robbie Buchanan / Additional Synthesizer Programming by: Gary K. Chang

Drums: John Robinson

Bass: Abraham Laboriel

Guitar: Paul M. Jackson, Jr.

Percussion: Paulinho da Costa

Background Vocals: Maxine Waters Willard, Julia Waters Tillman, Clydene Jackson Edwards and Maurice White

Guitar Solo by: Dann Huff

Vocal Arrangements by: Maurice White

Horn Arrangements by: Robbie Buchanan

Production Staff for Maurice White: Geri White, Leonard Smith and Chip Croop

7. When I Dream

Produced by: Maurice White for Kalimba Productions

Recorded at The Complex Studios (West Los Angeles, Calif.) and Sound Castle Recording Studios (Los Angeles, Calif.)

Date Recorded: May 21, 24, 1984

Recorded by: Jeremy Smith and Dennis McCade

Asst. Engineers: Mitch Gibson, Sharon Rice, Paul Ericksen, and Murray Dvorkin

Keyboards: Robbie Buchanan and Michel Colombier

Synthesizers & Synthesizer Programming by: Robbie Buchanan / Additional Synthesizer Programming by: Gary K. Chang

Drums: John Robinson

Bass: Abraham Laboriel

Guitar: Paul M. Jackson, Jr.

Percussion: Paulinho da Costa

Background Vocals: Maxine Waters Willard, Julia Waters Tillman, Clydene Jackson Edwards and Maurice White

Saxaphone Solo by: Earl Lon Price

Vocal Arrangements by: Maurice White

String Arrangements by: Michel Colombier

Production Staff for Maurice White: Geri White, Leonard Smith and Chip Croop

8. You're A Step in the Right Direction

Music by: John “Cougar” Mellencamp

Lyrics by: Barbra Streisand

Produced by: Albhy Galuten

Engineered by: Jack Joseph Puig

Additional Engineering by: Don Gehman

Assistant Engineers: David Schober, Judy Clapp, Mark Ettel, and Greg Droman

Recorded at Bill Schnee Sutio, Ocean Way Recording, and Rumbo Recorders (Los Angeles, Calif.)

Date Recorded: June 21, 1984

Mixed by: Jack Joseph Puig, Don Gehman and Albhy Galuten

Production Coordinator: Ivy Skoff

Drums: Russ Kunkel

Bass: Nathan East

Guitar: Steve Lukather, Don Felder

Keyboards: Albhy Galuten, James Newton Howard

Vocal Synthesizer: Albhy Galuten

Percussion: Joe Porcaro

Background Vocal: Monty Byrom

9. Clear Sailing

Written by: Peter McIan, Anne Black Montgomery

Produced by: Albhy Galuten

Engineered by: Jack Joseph Puig

Additional Engineering by: Don Gehman

Assistant Engineers: David Schober, Judy Clapp, Mark Ettel, and Greg Droman

Recorded at Bill Schnee Sutio, Ocean Way Recording, and Rumbo Recorders (Los Angeles, Calif.)

Date Recorded: June 24, 1984

Mixed by: Jack Joseph Puig, Don Gehman and Albhy Galuten

Production Coordinator: Ivy Skoff

Keyboards: James Newton Howard, Albhy Galuten

Vocal Synthesizer: Albhy Galuten

Strings Arranged by: Albhy Galuten, James Newton Howard

10. Here We Are At Last

Music by: Barbra Streisand

Lyrics by: Richard Baskin

Produced by: Richard Baskin & Barbra Streisand

Engineers: Mick Guzauski, Ed Cherney, John Arrias

Assistant Engineer: Paul Wertheimer

Recorded at The Record Plant (Hollywood, Calif.); Evergreen Studios (Burbank, Calif.); and Studio 55 (Los Angeles, Calif.)

Date Recorded: unknown

Production Coordinator: Kim Skalecki

Drums: John Robinson, Vinnie Colaiuta

Bass: Neil Stubenhaus

Guitar: Paul Jackson, Jr.

Volume Pedal Guitar: Art Johnson

Saxophones: Jerry Peterson, John Phillips

Synthesizer: Robbie Buchanan, Michel Colombier

Rhythm Arrangement by: Michael Colombier

Orchestra Arranged and Conducted by: Lee Holdridge

Concertmaster: Sid Sharp

About the Album

Emotion was Barbra’s first pop studio album since 1980’s Guilty and followed the release of the Yentl soundtrack. Barbra was most likely pressured by Columbia Records to produce another pop album that would be as successful as Guilty. Emotion, however, may have suffered from an abundance of producers (nine), whereas Guilty had the singular vision of Barry Gibb.

Streisand and her team began collecting songs for the album. One song considered was by Roger Edelman and titled “Over and Over (Am I Strong Enough).” Also considered was “Why Let It Go?” (which was used, instead, on 1988's Till I Loved You album). Meetings were held with Styxx's Dennis DeYoung to record his song, “The First Time” and a new song he was to write for Streisand. Another song, “Dreams on Hold” (writer unknown), was also worked on.

Kim Carnes duet

Ironically, the title track, “Emotion,” was the last to be recorded. Richard Perry (Stoney End; Barbara Joan Streisand albums) was brought in to produce it. He tried to replicate Peter Bliss’ original demo tape for Barbra’s version of “Emotion.” Bliss told The Barbra Streisand Music Guide, “Only three days into our recording sessions during the last week of June, Barbra arrived to sing. The track I did in the studio for Barbra was three keys higher than the demo, and I sang the guide vocal for her,” he recalled. “She had a little difficulty finding the phrasing of the song in her first four run-throughs. She took me aside in the control room and asked me to be honest with her regarding her performance. Barbra commented on how great she thought my voice was (something I wish I had on tape) and listened carefully to my instructions. Finally, she thanked me for the song itself and my honesty, then proceeded to sing it better than ever. Because it felt right to Barbra and me, I didn’t mind Barbra changing my line, ‘Sometimes I need to turn the beat around’ to ‘Sometimes I need to turn it all around.’”

“Make No Mistake, He’s Mine,” a duet with Kim Carnes, was recorded June 21, 1984 at Bill Schnee Studios.

“I was extremely flattered to hear from Barbra Streisand,” Carnes told St. Clair News-Aegis in 2013. “An hour later I sat down at the piano and the song just poured out. It wrote itself. I demoed it the next day and it was on her album.”

Bill Cuomo produced the track. “When I did the Streisand duet with Carnes, ‘Make No Mistake He’s Mine,’ Barbra loved the demo and the string/synth parts so much that she wanted the exact feel on the master only with a real orchestra,” he said.

In 2015, Kim Carnes told Rolling Stone magazine the definitive story about “Make No Mistake, She’s Mine”:

Barbra Streisand had already cut two songs of mine, "Love Comes From Unexpected Places" and "Stay Away." I'd gotten a call from Jon Peters [Streisand's then-manager] to write a duet to sing with her. While I was extremely flattered, I said, "Let me think about it. I'll try my best." As I hung up the phone, I thought, "That is so bizarre and it will never work in a million years because our voices are so different. I can't pull this off."

Much like the Gideon songs, I went to piano a half-hour later and an hour later the song was written. It's a love triangle and these two girls are singing back and forth to each other about being in love with the same dude. It just wrote itself. It was another meant-to-be. I was so afraid I would lose it if I got up from the piano that I yelled out, "Somebody please bring me a yellow pad and a pencil!" I didn't want my fingers to leave the piano keys. I knew, as much as I could ever know anything, that it was the only song we could ever sing together.

The song was re-recorded as “Make No Mistake, She’s Mine” by Ronnie Milsap and Kenny Rogers. The male version hit number one on the Country charts in 1987.

Ultimately, Kim Carnes’ gritty voice was a great foil for Streisand’s smooth one.

R&B/pop legend Maurice White produced three tracks on Emotion: “Time Machine,” “When I Dream,” and “Heart Don’t Change My Mind.”

White was the leader of the Grammy-winning group Earth Wind & Fire. “We could have done much better if we had more time,” White said of Emotion. “I was called in at the end of the project. I had to find the songs, too.”

White also worked on an unreleased song — “When the Lovin’ Goes Out of the Lovin’.”

Maurice White was frustrated with his experience working on the album. He wanted his songs released as singles. “They could have been hits,” he told the L.A. Times, “ I know it. I talked to Columbia about it but they didn't have the final say on the selection of singles. The whole thing was very frustrating.”

On top of that, White was upset that Barbra “had gone back into the studio and remixed my songs. This was after I thought they were completely finished,” White explained. “They snuck back and did it and didn't tell me. I wasn't happy with that at all. Obviously she didn't like the way she sounded. That I can understand. But if you change my work at least have the courtesy to let me know.”

Emotion boots

Barbra's engineer, John Arrias, told writer Karen Swenson (Barbra, The Second Decade) that on the song “Heart Don't Change My Mind,” “Maurice [White] was in San Francisco working on another project and he couldn't come down to work on it, so we called him. Barbra wanted a certain section of the song to have a short string passage ... and at the end of the song she wanted her vocal to continue with the orchestra—Maurice had turned her vocal off.”

(Photo, right): The Francois Villon boots that Barbra wore in the photo on the back cover of Emotion were sold at auction in 2004 for $660. The auction catalog described the boots as having “2 ½" heels, decorative metal diamond shape appliqués at the upper portion of the boot and are inscribed on bottom ‘Francois Villon Hand Made in Italy Vero Cuoio 38.’”

Jim Steinman wrote “Left In The Dark”. Steinman had hits by Bonnie Tyler (“Total Eclipse Of The Heart”) and Celine Dion (“It’s All Coming Back To Me Now”). Steinman’s fans, however, were divided over Streisand’s version of “Left in the Dark”. Meatloaf, who recorded the song in 1995, was not a fan of Barbra’s cut. “The first time I heard ‘Left in the Dark’ I laughed. I’ve never heard a song that pointed about jealousy. When Barbra Streisand did it, she just blew right by it.”

“Heart Don’t Change My Mind” by Diane Warren and Robbie Buchanan was one of the stand-out tracks on Emotion. “Diane actually wrote a lot of the melody,” Robbie Buchanan told Barbra Archives. “I wrote all the music, and then she started messing with the melody based on that music and then we finished the melody together and she wrote all the lyrics. That’s the first song I ever wrote with her, actually.”

Streisand's pink sweater

(Photo, above: Streisand auctioned her pink sweater in 2008. This is the one she wore on the cover of the EMOTION album.)

“You’re A Step in the Right Direction” featured music by John Mellencamp and lyrics by Barbra Streisand—her first lyrics on an album since co-writing “Wet” in 1979 and “Don’t Believe What You Read” in 1977.

Monty Byrom (sounding a bit like John Mellencamp) performed the background vocals on “You’re A Step” and enacted the spoken bridge on this song:

Streisand: Now listen baby…

Byrom: What do ya want?

Streisand: I’m sure glad you came along.

Byrom: That’s nice.

Streisand: But don’t push your luck honey.

Byrom: Who me?

Streisand: Mm-hmm, ‘cause our love is not that strong!

“I’ve had to live that one down ever since,” Byrom wrote on his web site. “Three years earlier I’m hangin’ with the Grateful Dead and recording Brent Mydland's solo record... To most of my fans it must have seemed like the ultimate sellout but, hey! Babs was just trying to break into the MTV crowd and I was just young and broke enough to accommodate her. They paid me A LOT of MONEY!!!”

John Mellencamp revealed in an interview that Streisand “wanted me to produce that album for her,” he said. “And I just wasn’t up for the task of making, you know, an entire record. I was on tour. I had other things that I was doing. And then all of a sudden, you know, Barbra Streisand wanted me to produce this record, and it was like, ‘Wow, I don’t know if I can do that or not. I think you can probably find somebody better to do that than me.’” But Streisand persisted and asked Mellencamp to write a song with her. “I was in L.A. and, so, I went over to her house about — for maybe, I guess, a week, and we messed around with the song,” said Mellencamp. “And she was quite — you know, I got to say, of all the people I’ve ever written with, she was the most fun.

Richard Baskin and Barbra Streisand

“You know, you don’t become Barbra Streisand and not be colorful and charming and witty and, you know, be able to get what you want from somebody. And she was — of all the people I’ve ever met, she was the most — I guess the word could be manipulative, too,” Mellencamp stated. “But I didn’t mind, you know … the thing that I remember about her more than anything was she was so beautiful. I had no idea that she was so beautiful just in an exotic physicality — skin. You know, that nose was so — she was just so beautiful, and when she smiled. And then I walked out after the experience and go, ‘I know why she’s Barbra Streisand now.’ Because she just had it. I mean, she was captivating for me sitting in a room just bullshittin’ with her. She was great.”

Barbra wrote “Here We Are At Last” with her boyfriend, Richard Baskin. “I’d originally written the melody as a theme for The Main Event,” Streisand wrote in her Just For the Record liner notes, “but put it on the shelf after recording an uptempo song, which was more appropriate for a comedy. Eventually, my friend Richard Baskin put lyrics to it, and the song found a home on my Emotion album. The melody for ‘Here We Are At Last’ underscores a bar scene in Nuts.”

Finally, “How Do You Keep the Music Playing?” was recorded during the Emotion sessions and remained unreleased. Streisand re-recorded it for 2003's The Movie Album.

Emotion peaked on the Billboard charts at number 19. Although it’s commonly accepted that Emotion was a dud for Streisand, it should be noted that it was awarded platinum status by the Recording Industry Association of America – meaning that it sold more than 1,000,000 copies.

Columbia Records released a special edition picture disc of the album (#9C9-39909).

Emotion picture disc

Singles

Click the links to read more...

Billboard Charts

The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine.

Here's the numbers for this Streisand album:

Gold: 500,000 units shipped

Platinum: 1 million units shipped.

Note: The record company must submit an album to the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) where it undergoes a certification process to become eligible for an award. The process entails an independent sales audit, which calculates the quantity of singles or albums shipped for sale, net after returns. The audit surveys shipments to the entire music marketplace, including retail, record clubs, television sales, Internet orders and other ancillary markets. Based on the certification of these shipments, a title is awarded Gold, Platinum, Multi-Platinum or Diamond status. The data here comes directly from official sources, mainly the RIAA online database.

My “Emotion” by Peter Bliss

Note: This article originally appeard on Mark Iskowitz's Barbra Streisand Music Guide site, which is no longer online. It appears on this page with Mark's permission.

Peter BlissI had the greatest thrill of having Barbra Streisand sing and record my song "Emotion" in 1984. I had previously released a solo album on United Artists Records and was writing songs primarily for myself. I can't remember if there was any particular thing that made me write this song. It really isn't a love song, but more about the need to feel alive. I was lucky to work with another music great, producer Richard Perry, helping to fashion the record from my original demo. I worked with Barbra on her very first vocal session of the song before The Pointer Sisters and all the synths were added. What an amazing voice!

In May-June 1984 I was working with Rondor Music as a songwriter and had written a song called "Emotion," which Rondor immediately brought to Richard Perry. He loved the song and placed it with Burton Cummings (formerly of The Guess Who) whom he was about to begin recording. Two weeks later, Barbra called Richard to ask if he would produce some music for her new album. He agreed, submitting my "Emotion" demo tape and four others. She chose "Emotion," and they were very excited, because it was one of the few uptempo songs they had for her album. I produced the demo in my home studio, singing and playing all the instruments, except for the signature horn figure, which my good friend and talented synthesist, Irwin Fisch, performed.

Within two weeks, I flew to Studio 55 in LA. Richard believed in the magic of my original demo and attempted to recreate the tracks as closely as possible and built from there. This was a key to his successful work on The Pointer Sisters records. Again, with Richard, as on the demo, I played guitar, including a similar solo, and programmed the prominent drum machine. Only three days into our recording sessions during the last week of June, Barbra arrived to sing. The track I did in the studio for Barbra was three keys higher than the demo, and I sang the guide vocal for her. She had a little difficulty finding the phrasing of the song in her first four run-throughs. She took me aside in the control room and asked me to be honest with her regarding her performance. Barbra commented on how great she thought my voice was (something I wish I had on tape) and listened carefully to my instructions. Finally, she thanked me for the song itself and my honesty, then proceeded to sing it better than ever. Because it felt right to Barbra and me, I didn't mind Barbra changing my line, "Sometimes I need to turn the beat around" to "Sometimes I need to turn it all around." "Emotion" was more R&B than dance on my demo, and only upon leaving LA during the initial sessions did it begin to take on its synth dance arrangement. Once the song grew with instrumental overdubs and The Pointer Sisters' background vocals, Barbra later returned to the studio to record additional vocals.

In August my manager told me that "Emotion" didn't just make the album but would also be Barbra's album title - icing on the cake. The album was released a few months later, with "Emotion" planned as the second single in early 1985 after "Left In The Dark" had its run. When that single faltered, however, in November Columbia released "Make No Mistake, He's Mine" as the second single, because Barbra was still in England working on the "Emotion" music video.

Album Cover Outtakes

Greg Gorman photographed the cover of Barbra's album, Emotion. Here's the full, uncropped photo that was used for the cover:

uncropped Emotion photo

And here are outtakes from the same session:

Greg Gorman photo Gorman photograph

Above: Kim Carnes and Streisand posed together for photographer Steve Schapiro for the cover of the single, “Make No Mistake He's Mine.”

End.

<-- Previous Streisand Album

Next Streisand Album -->

[ top of page ]